The Survey Says?

The good news is that we’re going to re-start our webinar series on US legal topics for Irish and Northern Irish businesses expanding to/operating in the US. But we need your help: we’re looking for feedback on the topics that might be of interest to an audience of Irish/Northern Irish businesses, their advisors, and other interested parties. The survey is at http://agglaw.polldaddy.com/s/irelandnisurvey

Please take a moment to give us some feedback, and please feel free to forward along to your colleagues and contacts. Thank you in advance for your help.

 

No Termination Payment for You!

I was recently asked whether the US had any regulations similar to the EU’s Commercial Agent Regulations–pursuant to which, upon termination or expiration of certain agency contracts, the agent would be entitled to an indemnity/compensation payment. The specific question related to a sales agency agreement, but the answer for the US is valid for agency, distribution and similar agreements.  The short answer is ‘no,’ the general rule in the US is that there are no termination payments due upon termination of a ‘commercial agent’ (or expiration of the term of the agency agreement). Notwithstanding that answer, I’d point out two things for an Irish/NI company potentially appointing a commercial agent in the US: (i) the underlying agency agreement should be clear on intellectual property rights in that the ownership of principal’s IP remains with the principal, the agent’s use of that IP inures to the benefit of the principal, and that the agent, even after termination/expiration, will execute whatever document are reasonably necessary to reflect the principal’s ownership of its IP; and (ii) the underlying agreement should also be clear that the agent must return all confidential materials/information to the principal upon termination/expiration of the term.

 

Can You Keep a (Trade) Secret?

I’ve previously written in this blog about the importance of trade secrets. See: Protecting Your Trade Secrets in the US. Some recent changes in US Federal trade secrets legislation will help Irish and Northern Irish companies better protect their trade secrets in the US.

“Trade secrets” are defined in the US as (i) information, including a formula, pattern, compilation, program, device, method, technique, or process; (ii) that derives independent economic value, actual or potential, from not being generally known to or readily ascertainable through appropriate means by other persons who might obtain economic value from its disclosure or use; and (iii) is the subject of efforts that are reasonable under the circumstances to maintain its secrecy. Continue reading

Critical Changes to US Visa Waiver Program Impact Irish/NI Companies

Bottom line up front: as of last Friday, new changes to the US’s Visa Waiver program restrict the use of that program by persons who have visited Iran, Iraq, Syria, or the Sudan at any time after March 1, 2011. Additional “countries of concern” may be added to this list. The nationality of the traveler is not an issue, so this change impacts any person traveling on an Irish or UK passport who has been to the listed countries in the relevant timeframe. Continue reading

Making US Arbitration Work for Irish and NI Companies (Really!)

Foreign investors increasingly complain that US arbitration is morphing in to a process closer to full-blown litigation. I’ve always found it interesting that ‘full-blown’ is used to describe ‘all-in’ litigation and ‘all-in’ infectious disease. But I digress. The fact remains that many of the advantages of arbitration—speedier resolutions at a lower cost—are being lost to a variety of interim challenges, enforcement questions and other processes that defer prompt resolution of disputes. The good news for Irish and Northern Irish companies is that Delaware offers a way to make arbitration ‘work’ again. Continue reading

Officer/Director Liability for Violations of the US Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act

Officers and directors of Irish and Northern Irish companies whose products would be regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (life sciences companies, specifically) should be aware of developments on the issue of individual prosecution under the FDCA for company violations of that statute.  AGG partner Alan Minsk and associate Alex Foster have written an update that is new to AGG’s Knowledge Center. Continue reading